SWIFT and BIC Codes for all the banks in the world. Find them here!

SWIFT Code Checker


example: CITIUS33 or CITIUS33XXX
   


How to check SWIFT/BIC codes

Validate your SWIFT/BIC code safely here. No sensitive information is viewed or stored when you use this tool.

To check you have the right SWIFT code, type it into the box above following the standard SWIFT/BIC code format. You’ll find more about the structure used for SWIFT numbers below.

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What is a SWIFT code?

A SWIFT code is a Business Identifier Code (BIC) used by banks and payment providers when making international transfers. The SWIFT/BIC code - also known as a SWIFT number - is a unique identifier which describes the bank or branch a payment should arrive in. 

Using this standard, globally recognised format is one way banks make sure wire transfers and SEPA payments are received safely - even when they’re travelling across international borders.

SWIFT Code example

SWIFT/BIC codes are normally either 8 or 11 characters long. 8 character codes typically give a head office address, while the longer format identifies a specific local branch of a bank. 

Here’s the format you need to know:

AAAA GB YY ZZZ

  • AAAA is the bank code. This will be 4 letters, which may look like a shortened form of the bank’s name - Bank of America’s code, for example, is BOFA
  • GB is the country code - if you’re receiving a payment locally, your country code will be US
  • YY is a location code, using both letters and digits, which shows the head office or primary location of the bank
  • ZZZ is optional, and represents a specific branch. Depending on your own or your recipient’s bank, you might not need to add these last 3 characters

How to find a SWIFT Code?

If you need to find your own SWIFT/BIC code to give to someone sending you money, or if you need to check the SWIFT number you have for a friend is correct, you can use the checker tool above.

You can also find your SWIFT number by logging into online banking, calling into your local branch, or checking correspondence with your bank. The details you need are often shown on statements and customer information letters.